mystate-ofgrace:

went for a walk into town and found a food festival and a real nice lake

talesoftenko:

slow-culture:

ARTISTS WE LIKE:

Anthony Samaniego

Keep up with him on Tumblr + Instagram

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quiet-nymph:

Photography by echinocactus

ternpest:

Mount Rainier, Washington. Photos by Trevor AndersonSarah Marino, and Hudson Henry. All rights reserved, please do not remove or alter the credit. 

lu-48:

The Most Beautiful Trees in the World

  1. Portland Japanese Garden, Portland, Oregon. Photo by unknown.
  2. Red maples trees path. Photo by Ildiko Neer.
  3. Most beautiful wisteria tree in the world. Photo by Brian Young.
  4. Yellow autumn in Central Park, New York. Photo by Christopher Schoenbohm.
  5. Amazing Angel Oak Tree, Charlston, Photo by Mark Requidan.
  6. Cherry blossom tree path, Germany. Photo by Shoeven.
  7. California in autumn. Photo by Mizzy Pacheco.
  8. Jacaranda trees in bloom, South Africa. Photo by Falke.
  9. Ponthus beech tree in Brocéliande forest, France. Photo by Christophe Kiciak.
  10. Beautiful cherry blossom road. Photo by unknown.

rhamphotheca:

Resurrection: The American Chestnut Is Set for a Genetically Modified Revival

by Andy Coghlan

The near-extinct American chestnut looks set to make a comeback. Genetically modified trees, which are resistant to a deadly fungus that has decimated the species, have produced the first resistant chestnuts. From these seeds, countless resistant trees could be grown in the wild.

An estimated 4 billion American chestnut trees (Castanea dentata) once covered the US, accounting for a quarter of all US hardwood trees. But in around 1900, a lethal fungus called Cryphonectria parasitica was accidentally imported in chestnut trees from Asia, and by the 1950s it had almost completely wiped out the American chestnut.

Over the past 20 years, the American Chestnut Research and Restoration Project has been trying to turn the situation around. Led by William Powell and Charles Maynard of the State University of New York in Syracuse, the team has used genetic engineering to create a strain of fungus-resistant chestnuts called Darling4.

The modified trees contain a gene from wheat called OxO, which makes an enzyme called oxalate oxidase that destroys the toxic oxalic acid made by the fungus, preventing cankers from forming on the tree. By-products from the enzyme’s action help the tree’s own natural defences to fight off the fungus…

(read more: New Scientist)

photograph by Klaus Lang/Corbis